Category: Food

Exploring Natural Sweeteners: Date Syrup – A Sweet Adventure Awaits You

Get ready to explore a seriously fascinating topic today – Date Syrup. This isn’t just your run-of-the-mill sweetener; it’s a natural wonder that brings both flavor and health benefits to the table. We’re diving deep into why dates are impressive, what sets this syrup apart, and how I’m incorporating it seamlessly into my daily routine – think cereals, teas, smoothies, and even the creation of mouthwatering raw brownies. Let’s dive in!

Dates: Nature’s Nutrient Powerhouses

Dates have been a dietary staple for ages, and they pack a punch when it comes to nutritional value. These little powerhouses are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber that supports digestive health. We’re talking about potassium, magnesium, iron – the essentials your body craves. And don’t even get me started on the antioxidants they bring to the table – they’re like the superheroes of the food world, fighting off those harmful free radicals.

Date Syrup’s Sweet Symphony

Hold up, because here comes the game-changer – Date Syrup. This isn’t your ordinary sweet stuff. Picture this: a smooth, caramel-like experience with a hint of honey’s sweetness. The process is equally impressive – dates simmered, strained, and reduced to create a liquid gold that’s not just about flavor; it’s about taking care of your well-being too.

More Than Just a Sweet Fix

But wait, there’s more to this sweet story. Date Syrup isn’t just about taste – it’s about delivering real benefits:

  1. Nutrient Boost: Date Syrup holds onto the goodness from dates – vitamins, minerals, and fiber – all in one delicious package.
  2. Digestive Hero: With fiber in the mix, your digestion game gets an automatic upgrade – no more sluggish feelings.
  3. Steady Energy: Natural sugars mean you’re getting that energy boost without the notorious sugar crashes.
  4. Antioxidant Warrior: The antioxidants in Date Syrup are on a mission to fight off those harmful free radicals, keeping you in tip-top shape.

Culinary Adventures Await

Get ready to unleash your inner culinary artist, because Date Syrup is a versatile ingredient that brings out the best in your dishes:

  1. Breakfast Elevation: Elevate your morning by drizzling Date Syrup over cereals, oats, or yogurt – a touch of sophistication to start your day.
  2. Tea Infusion: Jazz up your teas with a splash of Date Syrup – a natural sweetness that adds a layer of depth to your cuppa.
  3. Smoothie Magic: Transform your smoothies into a taste sensation with a spoonful of Date Syrup – an upgrade that’s both flavorful and nutritious.
  4. Dessert Enchantment: Wave your magic spatula and turn your ice cream into something spectacular with Date Syrup. Baking? Swap it in for sugar and watch your desserts soar to new heights.

Raw Brownies: A No-Bake Wonder

And here’s the pièce de résistance – raw brownies. No need for an oven; just dates, nuts, cocoa, and a generous drizzle of Date Syrup for a guilt-free indulgence. These brownies are everything – fudgy, decadent, and oh-so-satisfying.

So, if you’re tired of the same old sweeteners, remember that Date Syrup is here to shake things up. It’s all about that natural, rich sweetness that’s as good for your taste buds as it is for your body. Whether you’re adding it to your morning routine or experimenting with raw brownies, Date Syrup brings a touch of elegance and health to every bite. Get ready to savor the sweetness, my friends! ????????

Regenerating and Edible Immune Supporting Plants: Scallions

What Scallions Can Do for Your Health

Your grocer might label them as green onions. Scallions are an allium (Latin for “garlic”) vegetables. I use them as a suitable onion replacement. Their pungent relatives include onions, leeks, shallots, and chives. Cooks worldwide toss scallions into many Asian style dishes that needs a punch of flavor, but they aren’t limited to Asian style. The hollow, tube-like green tops have a mild, oniony zing, while the small, white bulb ends offer a sharper bite. In my opinion, they are pre-mature onions

Nutritional Values:

Scallions are mostly water, 1 cup is just 32 calories, only trace amounts of fat, and zero cholesterol. It also has less sugar and fewer carbs than vegetables like carrots, potatoes, and corn.

  • About 16% of your daily requirement for folate, a vitamin your body needs to make DNA and which is especially important for women who are pregnant
  • About 25% of your daily value for vitamin C, an antioxidant that helps protect your cells from damage
  • Twice the daily recommended amount for adults for vitamin K, which helps your blood clot and keeps your bones strong.
  • Iron — It plays a role in the formation of hemoglobin, cell growth and differentiation, metabolism, endocrine and brain function, energy production, and immune health.
  • Potassium — This mineral balances the electrical and chemical processes in your body, which in turn helps maintain proper muscle contractions, transmit nerve impulses, regulate blood sugar levels and improve blood pressure, among

Health Benefits

Prevents infections. Extracts of onions, garlic, and their relatives have long been used medicinally. They can kill bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Lab tests on certain varieties of onions showed that at high enough concentrations, some can kill or slow the growth of salmonella or E. coli.

Helps in fighting cancer. Scallions and other allium vegetables block mainly stomach cancer growth. Researchers believe that a compound called allicin, which is what gives you garlic breath, may prevent cells from turning cancerous or slow tumors from spreading.

Protects your body. Vegetables in the onion group are packed with phytonutrients, including chemicals called antioxidants that defend your cells against damage. Antioxidants in onions like flavonoids and polyphenols hunt down free radicals, substances that can lead to cancer, inflammation, and age-related diseases. Fresh scallions are always best because antioxidants in vegetables lose their power during cooking.

Fiber. A cup of cut scallions has about 10% of the fiber you need for the whole day. Getting lots of fiber helps you feel full, keeps your cholesterol levels down, and may lower your chances for diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions.

 

Warning: Scallions are high in vitamin K, which works against blood-thinning medication. If you’re taking warfarin to prevent strokes, heart attacks, or blood clots, ask your doctor if green onions are safe for you.  Always wash all fresh vegetables, including those that are sold prewashed and bagged. It’s rare, but people have been sickened or died of hepatitis after eating contaminated scallions.

Regeneration

When regrowing scallions you can use them to cook with and as a great home decoration. They grow about 3-4 inches + a week. Regrowing helps you #savemoney, #reducewaste, and wow the world. When doing a plant project with children I always use scallions since they grow so fast with low maintenance, and children have short attention spans, that need to see live results.

How to Use Scallions

You can find them practically anywhere. Wild scallions might be growing in your backyard. Your produce aisle likely stocks them year-round.

Here are some shopping tips:

  • Pick scallions with crisp leaves and bright color.
  • Trim the top and bottom tips and rinse with water. You can eat both green and white parts.
  • Store scallions in the fridge for maximum freshness.

People often use green onions as a garnish on salads, soups, rice bowls or stews. But you can enjoy them in lots of other ways!

Grill them whole. Brush with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and grill them for a couple of minutes for a sweet, charred flavor.

Puree them. Put cooked scallions in a blender and mix in eggs, flour, and a dash of soy sauce. They taste similar to scallion pancakes served at Chinese or Korean restaurants.

Buy Seeds

Edible Herbs: Dandelion Wildfood and Medicine

I want to start with dandelion, ( Taraxacum Officinale)
which is my favorite because it can be found everywhere. The first sign that it’s good for you is its bitter taste. We all know the bitter the better.  I have come to view them as an amazing gift instead of a weedy curse. Our most powerful remedies are commonly found growing under our feet. My suggestion would be to only pull dandelion from an area closed off from dogs, cats don’t really mess with herbs unless it’s beneficial, they are a bit smarter. 


Identifying Dandelion: 

Dandelion is easy to misidentify. Many look-alike plants have similar leaves, but dandelion leaves are hairless. They generally have toothed edges that gave the plant its French name, “dent de lion.” Leaves and hollow flower stems grow directly from the rootstock. you can find them EVERYWHERE — pioneers infiltrating cracks in sidewalks, grassy lawns, well-tended gardens, abandoned city lots, and mountain meadows.
Soil benefits: What isn’t as well known is that it improves soil quality. Roots draw minerals up from deep layers of earth – concentrating them in the whole plant. When the plant dies back it deposits these minerals into the soil. Roots also aerate hard packed soil and create pathways for water to enter.

Nutrients: Every part of dandelion is useful. The leaves are high in vitamins and minerals including Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and vitamins A, B and C.  Dandelion is higher in Vitamin A than any other garden plant. Roots contain inulin, mucilage, latex resin, and teraxacin.
Inulin stimulates helpful bacteria to grow. Inulin aids digestion by increasing the number of good bacteria in the gut, particularly Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. These bacteria help: fend off unwanted pathogens (bad bacteria)

Mucilage is used in medicine as it relieves irritation of mucous membranes by forming a protective film. It is known to act as a soluble, or viscous, dietary fiber that thickens the fecal mass, an example being the consumption of fiber supplements containing Psyllium seed husks.

Dandelion has several beneficial properties; it is anti-diabetic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory. In some studies, dandelion components were shown to act by inhibiting oxidative stress in liver injury, reducing high cholesterol, and reversing streptozotocin-induced diabetes. It also has anti-rheumatic, anti-carcinogenic, diuretic, laxative, hypoglycemic, and chloretic effects. 

Harvesting Dandelion :

You can harvest leaves, flowers, and roots in the proper season. In early spring leaves quickly shoot up and gather sunlight. This is when they are most tender and can be eaten fresh, cooked, or dried for tea. As the leaves age and are exposed to sunlight, they can become very bitter. To preserve leaves for tea, harvest on a dry day. Use a rubber band to bundle small bunches then hang to dry, or dry leaves in single layers in baskets. Store in a glass jar for up to a year.

Buds appear at the base of the leaves in early spring. These can be eaten fresh, cooked or pickled. Buds open into flowering heads. These are best gathered for food or medicine on sunny days when they are dry and fully open, usually in April or early May.

Root medicinal properties vary a little from season to season. In spring, they are more bitter and have optimal medicine as a digestive stimulant. In the fall, they are sweeter and higher in a carbohydrate called inulin, which is excellent for diabetics.

Eating Dandelion

Leaves – can be a gourmet green. They are most delectable in the early spring before flowering. As they are exposed to more sunlight and growth slows, they become intensely bitter. Harvest tender young leaves from the inside of the plant for the best flavor. I pick young leaves and add them to salads. While they taste a little bitter, they add flavor variety as well as dense nutrients. Dandelion leaves have three times more Calcium, Iron, and Vitamin A than spinach! Leaves can also be steamed, sautéed or boiled and then incorporated into dips, casseroles, and soups. Boiling bitter leaves in a pot of water for about 5 minutes helps to remove some of the bitter taste.

Buds – The key to eating dandelion buds is getting them early when they are still tight little buttons close to the base of the plant. I like them best when the sepals have just unfolded. I pinch off the sepals from the base of the bud because they are a little bitter. Buds can be pickled, added to sautés, soups, etc.

If you are looking for dandelion root’s anti-inflammatory and liver cooling properties I recommend eating it fresh, tincturing it or making vinegar. The dry root tea is nutritive, good for digestion and detoxifying. To dry dandelion roots, dig up in spring through fall. Wash thoroughly. With a long piece of string, wrap each root a couple times, let out 6 inches of string and wrap another root, making a long dandelion chain. Hang until completely dry or dehydrate. 

Topical Uses: Dandelion flower’s high nutrient content makes it a popular addition to facial cleansers and creams. The flower oil is used for inflammation, sore muscles, and arthritic joints. The milky white sap from the plant is used to get rid of warts.

Tincture – Only tincture the roots! It’s the easiest way to use dandelion for supporting liver health, digestion and detoxification but all tinctures contain alcohol and this is not appropriate for everyone. Vinegar can be used as a substitute. Chop cleaned fresh roots in small pieces. Place in a jar and cover with 80-100 proof vodka or brandy. Cover with a tight-fitting lid. Label, including the date. Let sit for two weeks, shaking it occasionally. Press with muslin cloth and store in a glass jar in a cool dark place. Tincture will last 7-9 years. Do not worry about the milky substance in the tincture that falls to the bottom. This is inulin, and you should just shake the tincture before you use it. Use 30-80 drops depending on usage 2-3 times a day.

Don’t want to forage on your own? Try this tea: 

Dry Dandelion Root:

Nature’s Way Dandelion Root, 1,575 MG

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“Sip and Revive: Detoxifying and Energizing Magic of Charcoal Lemonade”

Hey there, health enthusiasts! If you’re on the hunt for a drink that’s not just refreshing but also packs a detox punch, look no further than the mysterious and magical concoction known as charcoal lemonade. Yep, you heard that right – charcoal. Lemonade. Let’s unlock the detoxifying and energizing wizardry that this dark elixir brings to the table (or rather, your glass!).

Charcoal Charisma: Before you start picturing barbecue grills, let’s clarify – we’re talking about activated charcoal here. It’s like a magnet that’s been to detox school. Activated charcoal has this incredible ability to bind to toxins and impurities in your body. When you sip on charcoal lemonade, it’s like giving your system a little helper to escort those unwanted guests out of your body.

Gut Love: Your gut is like a second brain, and it deserves all the love it can get. Activated charcoal in lemonade can help absorb excess gas and those belly-bloating culprits, making you feel lighter and more comfortable.

Beauty Glow: Detox isn’t just about the inside – it shows on the outside too. Charcoal lemonade might just become your skin’s BFF. By getting rid of toxins that can cause breakouts, this drink could help give your skin that radiant glow you’ve been chasing.

Say Goodbye to Hangovers: Had a bit too much fun last night? Charcoal lemonade could be your morning-after lifesaver. It might help mop up those post-party toxins and alleviate that pounding head.

Energizing Elixir: Now, onto the energy bit. Lemons are like a burst of sunshine, loaded with vitamin C. When combined with activated charcoal, you’ve got yourself an energizing duo that could help kick-start your metabolism and give you that extra boost.

A Word of Caution: While charcoal lemonade has its charms, it’s important not to go overboard. Activated charcoal can also bind to essential nutrients, so moderation is key. And if you’re on medications, chat with your healthcare provider before making this your daily sip.

DIY Magic: Want to unlock the magic yourself? Making charcoal lemonade is like whipping up a spell in your kitchen. Mix activated charcoal with fresh lemon juice, a touch of sweetness (like maple syrup or honey), and water. Voila – you’ve got yourself a detoxifying elixir!

So there you have it, the dark, detoxifying, and energizing wizardry of charcoal lemonade. It’s like a secret potion that your body will thank you for, inside and out. So go ahead, raise your glass to a detox journey that’s as enchanting as it is refreshing! ????????

Boost Health with This Backyard Secret

Warning! You may want to talk to your doctor before using a natural remedy to treat a serious illness.

Since we can remember, man has looked to nature to cure poor health. Within the last decade notably, herbs have made their way into thought culture with the recognition of plant medicines resembling ayahuasca, ibogaine, and cannabis in the headlines for their powerful abilities to heal the most prominent diseases. However, these plant remedies can be forbidden to use for healing in many countries.

The good news is that common weeds in our yards yield superb healing skills and guess what — they’re legal! Here are twelve weeds that possess fascinating medicinal properties.

1. Red Clover (Trifolium pre tense) has chemicals that mimic the female hormone estrogen in the body. Medical professionals examine the herb as a treatment for menopausal symptoms like hot flashes. Doctors also warn women with a history of breast cancer to stay away from the synthetic estrogen. Estrogen-like chemicals have a way of bringing on cancer. 

  • The weed helps in reducing the complications during and after menopause.
  • It helps in improving bone density.
  • The plant extract is helpful to improve the immune system, treat could and respiratory disorders.
  • The decoction of this weed helps in regulating heart problems like high blood pressure.
  • The plant is also helpful in treating skin inflammation, eczema, and psoriasis.

2. Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) The plant is known to treat gout, aching muscles and joints, arthritis, anemia and eczema. It is widely used to treat joint pain. Capsules of dried stinging nettle is also a good remedy to reduce the symptoms of hay fever. It is also popularly used to treat bladder problems. If you boil nettle it can be eaten as a collared greens alternative. It is very easy to get stung by a stinging nettle. Applying crushed up dandelion, horsetail, Aloe vera, jewelweed or the leaf of a dock or lock plant can counter the acid in the sting.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/n/nettle03.html

3. Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum) is your livers best friend. This has been known for over 2000 years. Research found this may be good for people who damage their liver with alcohol. Silymarin is a chemical that may protect the liver from damage caused by a drug overdose, as well as damage from over the counter drugs like Tylenol. If you are a shroomer, this may be an antidote for a poisonous shroom.

  • The plant decoction is used to cure Jaundice and liver disorders, as it maintains the bile production.
  • The plant also cures heartburns and depression.
  • It is also used for allergies, blood disorders and has anti-aging properties.
  • The plant has been proved to cure Cancer, Malaria as it contains flavonoids which are helpful against the unwanted cells.

4. Horsetail (Equisetum Ravens) – The Greeks and Roman Empires used the herb to stop bleeding and weight gain, heal ulcers and wounds and treat tuberculosis and kidney problems. Used in a tea it tastes mildly bitter, like chamomile. It acts as a diuretic and increases urination. This stuff is so powerful, doctors suggest taking a multivitamin when drinking lots of horsetail tea because it can flush vital nutrients, such as vitamin B1, potassium and thiamine, out of one’s system.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/h/hortai39.html

5. Dandelion – within the past, Europeans used remedies made of blowball (Taraxacum sp.) roots, leaves and flowers to treat fever, boils, eye issues, polygenic diseases and symptoms. Practitioners of ancient Chinese medication take dandelions for abdomen ailments, and breast issues like inflammation or lack of milk flow. Dandelions have a bitter taste and contain vitamins A, B, C and D, and iron, K, and metallic element. Like Milkweed, Dandelion was a traditional remedy for warts. One would protect the skin surrounding the wart with Vaseline. Cover the wart with stem juices that were squeezed out. Let dry and cover with a plaster and repeat daily. After three days the wart should be dried up and a brownish color, it’s then it will fall off.  This weed can be used like coffee, it’s washed, cut into large pieces and dried gently beside the open fire or in the sun until they became hard and brittle. You want to drink it because, the root contains bitters, which is good for cleansing the liver, spleen, and gallbladder. In Co Meath (Ireland) pieces of the dried root were simmered in buttermilk, strained and taken as a cure for yellow jaundice.

Serious about using this?

Read More: http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/d/dandel08.html

6. Milkweed – The main use of this herb is for its benefit on the lungs. It helps with breathing conditions, liquefying mucous and reducing spasms. It has also been widely used by Native Americans as a contraceptive.  The sap produced, that’s milky white/The milky white sap produced, is used to remove warts, heal ringworms and snakebites. The sap contains latex, alkaloids, and cardiac glycosides. However, the herb also contains chemicals harmful to livestock and humans. The herb produces toxic chemicals to protect against hungry herbivores. It can help a person manage constipation and diarrhea.

7. Chicory (Cichorium Intybus), a sky blue flower is often seen along roads, provides the largest insulin supply. According to WebMD, patients use insulin to fight high cholesterol and triglycerides. Many women with type-2 diabetes benefit from taking insulin by reducing the rate of blood sugar increase they get after eating. hickory coffees happens when coffee lovers add roasted and dried root to their cups of hot water. Chicory coffee is big in New Orleans.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chicor61.html

8. Burdock (Arctium sp.) – Traditionally, healers use burdock to clear toxins from the blood and increase urination, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. The plant also is used to treat skin ailments, such as eczema, acne, and psoriasis. The leaves and roots of burdock are edible and contain inulin, like chicory, so they may aid digestion and/or cause a nasty case of flatulence. Burdock also contains high quantities of antioxidants that can prevent damage to cells.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/burdoc87.html

 

9. Plantain (Plantago Major) –  This is the weed commonly found in sidewalk cracks is actually one of the best healing herbs on the planet. Since the age of the ancient, Greek doctors have used plantains to speed wound healing. Native Americans have used it to heal wounds, cure fever, and to draw out toxins from stings and bites, including snake bites.

Plantain as a poultice is recommended on wounds or as a nutrient-rich tea to treat diarrhea. Plantain leaves are mainly used for herbal preparations, so it is best to pick just the leaves, rather than dig out the entire plant. Pinch off unblemished leaves, selecting slightly mature ones over the very tender leaves, unless you’re planning to use them in salads. Mature leaves have a higher concentration of potent phytochemicals.

10. Purslane – Is commonly found in yards and gardens, but most people do not ever consider harvesting it. It has a slightly citrusy taste and a crisp texture. It is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. This herb is also rich in vitamins A, C, and various B vitamins, as well as a number of minerals. Tilling brings seeds to the surface where they quickly germinate. Purslane seeds germinate best with soil temperatures of 90 degrees so mulching may again help to control it. Since it germinates in high soil temperatures also means it doesn’t appear until June.

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/prugol77.html

 

11. Lamb’s Quarters – Are Very Nutritious The leaves of Lamb’s Quarters can be harvested and used like spinach. Use this herb in your juice, salad, soup, or any recipe that calls for spinach. It has a high content of vitamins A and K, as well as calcium and magnesium. Lamb’s Quarters is considered one of the most nutritious wild foods. These are just a few examples of herbs and weeds that have nutritional value. You may have some of these growing in your backyard and not even know it. Before harvesting any outdoor weeds or herbs, verify the identity of the plant. 

12. Bee Balm (wild bergamot) – Bee-balm is most often viewed as a wildflower and actually sold as an ornamental.  However, this plant can occur as a weed in some pasture and rangeland environments.  Bee-balm or wild bergamot is found throughout the United States except in Florida and along the West coast. The flowers make an attractive edible garnish in salads. Bee Balm herb is a source of oil of thyme, and is noted for its fragrance. The fresh or dried leaves are brewed into a medicinal tea. Bee Balm leaves and flowers and stems are used in alternative medicine as an antiseptic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic and stimulant. A medicinal infusion is used internally in the treatment of colds, catarrh, headaches, and gastric disorders, to reduce low fevers and soothe a sore throat, to relieve flatulence, nausea, for menstrual pain, and insomnia. Steam inhalation of the plant can be used for sore throats, and bronchial catarrh (inflammation of the mucous membrane, causing an increased flow of mucus). Externally, Bee Balm is a medicinal application for skin eruptions and infections. Bergamot’s distinctive aroma, found in both the leaf and flower is wonderful for use in potpourri. While a fragrant herb in its own right, Wild Bergamot is not the source of the commonly used Bergamot Essential oil.

So there you have it, I covered some of the main backyard herbs, of course, there are many more. Maybe I’ll make a part 2 to this. Remember to be mindful that if you plan on ingesting these herbs, make sure they haven’t been sprayed with pesticides or treated with chemicals. Try looking in your own backyard to see if any of these wild medicinal weeds are at your disposal!

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/bethro34.html

References:

https://wellnessmama.com/59478/backyard-herbal-remedies/

https://juicing-for-health.com/weeds-that-are-medicinal-herbs

https://www.theorganicprepper.com/10-medicinal-weeds-that-may-grow-in-your-backyard/

http://www.naturallivingideas.com/plantain-benefits-uses/

https://altnature.com/gallery/beebalm.htm

http://www.pracreation.com/10-common-weeds-that-actually-have-medicinal-properties/

We eat Sterilized Bananas ???

Bananas are a starchy, sweet botanical berry and edible fruit that come from flowering banana plants. I always wondered about seeds in the banana. Are there any seeds, are they so tiny that they’re edible, what’s the real deal? In my ignorance, I actually believed there were tiny seeds that were edible, like strawberries. With my logic, I assumed the seeds are there, they’re just too tiny to see, I figured how else do they grow? How do you grow a plant without seeds? I’m guessing the same way you grow ginger or potatoes.

The older bananas are considered wild. The wild banana mostly consists of inedible seeds and a starchy pulp. Many cultures boiled it before eating. I can understand why the wild banana was replaced by the hybrid sterilized banana, and I can also see the consequences being a less nutritious fruit. The first bananas were discovered around 10,000 years ago in the Papau New Ginea area.

The most recent banana is the Cavendish-grown from a corm, shown here next to a wild banana. They are a split of two wild banana varieties; musa akuminata and musa balbisiana. They aren’t grown from seeds but from a bulb or rhizome. You plant the bulb in the ground and it splits. The banana plant is considered a plant because it’s not a tree. Now we have what we call a sterilized banana with undeveloped seeds yummy.

Some other bananas are the musa velutina, or the hairy pink banana. The peels are like firm springs that come right off the banana. They are a bit smaller and filled with seeds about 30 – 40 to each one. The taste is similar to the modern popular banana but a bit tangy.

Exploring Natural Sweeteners : Maple Syrup

One of our biggest issues as humans is our consumption of sugar or our addiction. On average we consume way too much sugar daily. Some great alternatives to help curve the habit, with moderation is maple syrup. Maple syrup was produced way before European settlers came to America. It holds cultural significance to many aboriginals and native American tribes. They viewed maple sap as a source of energy and nutrition.

Canada produces 30 liters of maple syrup a year, which leads to 80 percent of the world production. The maple leaf is Canada’s natural symbol which is featured on their flag. Maple syrup is graded by how much light passes through it. Make sure depending on the color that it’s not mixed with filler syrups like High Fructose, or Rice Syrup. Rice syrup is a common filler in honey.

Since maple is an unrefined natural sweetener, it contains higher levels of beneficial nutrients and antioxidants.

 Some health benefits are:

  • Rich in antioxidants properties, 65 to be exact, that can help delay or prevent diseases caused by free radicals such as cancer, or diabetes.
  • Protects against various cardiovascular disorders
  • Helps maintain a healthy heart
  • Aids in maintaining male reproductive health.
  • Boosts Immune system
  • Fights Inflammatory Diseases
  • May Help Protect Against Cancer
  • Helps Protect Skin Health

 In all plants, a sort of sugar is naturally present. Plants’ primary sugar is a product of photosynthesis that occurs when the sunshine comes into contact with the plant’s leaves. Sucrose is the most prevalent type of sugar found in maple syrup (at least 66 percent of the sugar in maple syrup must be sucrose in order for it to be considered pure).

Maple syrup is considered, by many, to be a “green choice.” This is due to the fact that a tree is not harmed when the sap is extracted. Keep in mind, the sap is the core ingredient, this is indeed a green choice. Maple syrup is quite popular in the vegan lifestyle. This choice has proven to be an excellent substitute for the ordinary sugar. Pure maple syrup has been called the complete and total “green choice.” Many individuals have named this is a green option. It ought to be noted, maple syrup does not harm the environment. This is a natural item.

Organic Chocolate Ice Cream Recipe

Ice Cream is always a fun treat. As long as it’s enjoyed in moderation and s made with as many organic ingredients as possible. Remember the fewer toxins you put in your body, the less your body has to get rid of them.

Here’s a recipe below. 

Amount Ingredients
2 cups organic cream or colostrum
1 cup organic milk
To taste organic agave (sweetener)
To taste organic vanilla
2 eggs organic egg yolks (optional)
2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa or cacao powder
Optional Cacao nibs
1/2 tsp Cinnamon


Put ingredients in a bowl; whisk to mix, pour into ice cream maker, turn on for 25 minutes (to taste), and you’re done.

Chipotle Maple Sweet Potatoe Burgers [VEGAN]

Makes 4 yummy veggie burgers

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon virgin olive oil 
  • 1 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), diced small
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, diced small
  • 1/2 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 cup quick cooking oats, dry
  • 1/8 cup pecans, minced
  • 1 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1 tablespoons flax meal
  • 1 tablespoons quinoa
  • 1 cup of baby Bella mushrooms, quartered
  • dash of kosher salt or sea salt (½ teaspoon)
  • 1 teaspoon of cumin
  • 1 teaspoon of allspice
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 teaspoon chipotle chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 5 tablespoons maple syrup or Mike’s Hot Honey
    • If you choose the honey, add 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 4 hamburger buns

STEPS:

STEP1: In a medium saucepan, add the diced sweet potatoes and cover with water. Add a dash of salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Then, reduce to low and simmer for about 15 minutes until very tender. Drain and set aside for later.

STEP2:

In a medium frying pan, heat the olive oil over medium-low. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 10 minutes, until the onions are brown.

STEP 3: 

In a large bowl, add the oats, add the quinoa, through spices and pepper. Whisk well to combine. Add the boiled sweet potatoes and the onion mixture as well as the maple syrup. Using a wooden spoon, mash the sweet potatoes and mix everything together very well.

STEP 4:

Preheat oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Coat your hands with a non-stick cooking spray and form the burger mix into eight large patties. Arrange on the baking sheet in a single layer.

STEP 5:

Bake at 400 F for about 45 minutes, turning the patties over halfway through. Once done, remove from oven and allow to rest for about 5-10 minutes.

This will set the patties.

Serve hot, with barbecue sauce. Add avocado, arugula to buns for serving

add some Sweet Potato Fries to the Mix

 

Lemon Powers

When life hands you lemons, appreciate them, They are very good for you. 

Lemons though acidic to the taste, but do the opposite in the body. They actually are alkaline-forming to the body. Lemons are in fact the highest alkaline-forming food and are great at keeping the bodies PH level balanced. Because of their antibacterial properties, lemons can be found in kitchens all over the world.

Lemons are your livers best friend. It helps to stimulate and detoxify the liver. Starting your day with lemon water is a great way to daily detoxify. Lemons help dissolve uric acid and other poisons.

Lemon peels contain potent phytonutrient tangeretin which protect against brain disorders like Parkinson’s disease

Guards you against Hangovers Lemon juice and room temperature water helps reduce nausea and aids in metabolizing alcohol. 

Dissolves calcium like deposits Lemons decrease the acidity of urine; this prevents the formation of calcium oxalate and uric acid stones.  Lemons are rich in citric acid this helps to dissolve gallstones, calcium deposits, and kidney stones. 

Lemons contain flavonoids and Vitamin C, making it a great immune system booster to help the body fight off infections. Also, vitamin C helps neutralize free radicals that lead to aging and disease.

They Treat Scurvy This seems random but if you’re a cruise ship traveler this may intrigue you. 

In 1747, a naval surgeon named James Lind cured scurvy with fresh lemons. To this day, the British Navy requires ships to carry enough lemons so that every sailor could have one ounce of juice a day. In the past, lemons were replaced with limes; this is where the English got their nickname “limeys.”

Lemons protect from intestinal worms. One cup of spearmint juice, black salt, and lemon juice daily removes all types of parasite infections from the stomach. 

Lemon Nutrition:

  • Lemons contain vitamin C, B-complex vitamins, citric acid, flavonoids, potassium, calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, and fiber.
  • Lemons contain more potassium than apples or grapes. Potassium is beneficial to the heart. But you still need Bananas for your potassium fix. 

Warning: Stay away from restaurant and bar lemons. Lemons not washed properly can lead to microbial flora

“We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons.” –Alfred E. Newman