Category: Spices

Regenerating and Edible Immune Supporting Plants: Scallions

What Scallions Can Do for Your Health

Your grocer might label them as green onions. Scallions are an allium (Latin for “garlic”) vegetables. I use them as a suitable onion replacement. Their pungent relatives include onions, leeks, shallots, and chives. Cooks worldwide toss scallions into many Asian style dishes that needs a punch of flavor, but they aren’t limited to Asian style. The hollow, tube-like green tops have a mild, oniony zing, while the small, white bulb ends offer a sharper bite. In my opinion, they are pre-mature onions

Nutritional Values:

Scallions are mostly water, 1 cup is just 32 calories, only trace amounts of fat, and zero cholesterol. It also has less sugar and fewer carbs than vegetables like carrots, potatoes, and corn.

  • About 16% of your daily requirement for folate, a vitamin your body needs to make DNA and which is especially important for women who are pregnant
  • About 25% of your daily value for vitamin C, an antioxidant that helps protect your cells from damage
  • Twice the daily recommended amount for adults for vitamin K, which helps your blood clot and keeps your bones strong.
  • Iron — It plays a role in the formation of hemoglobin, cell growth and differentiation, metabolism, endocrine and brain function, energy production, and immune health.
  • Potassium — This mineral balances the electrical and chemical processes in your body, which in turn helps maintain proper muscle contractions, transmit nerve impulses, regulate blood sugar levels and improve blood pressure, among

Health Benefits

Prevents infections. Extracts of onions, garlic, and their relatives have long been used medicinally. They can kill bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Lab tests on certain varieties of onions showed that at high enough concentrations, some can kill or slow the growth of salmonella or E. coli.

Helps in fighting cancer. Scallions and other allium vegetables block mainly stomach cancer growth. Researchers believe that a compound called allicin, which is what gives you garlic breath, may prevent cells from turning cancerous or slow tumors from spreading.

Protects your body. Vegetables in the onion group are packed with phytonutrients, including chemicals called antioxidants that defend your cells against damage. Antioxidants in onions like flavonoids and polyphenols hunt down free radicals, substances that can lead to cancer, inflammation, and age-related diseases. Fresh scallions are always best because antioxidants in vegetables lose their power during cooking.

Fiber. A cup of cut scallions has about 10% of the fiber you need for the whole day. Getting lots of fiber helps you feel full, keeps your cholesterol levels down, and may lower your chances for diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions.

 

Warning: Scallions are high in vitamin K, which works against blood-thinning medication. If you’re taking warfarin to prevent strokes, heart attacks, or blood clots, ask your doctor if green onions are safe for you.  Always wash all fresh vegetables, including those that are sold prewashed and bagged. It’s rare, but people have been sickened or died of hepatitis after eating contaminated scallions.

Regeneration

When regrowing scallions you can use them to cook with and as a great home decoration. They grow about 3-4 inches + a week. Regrowing helps you #savemoney, #reducewaste, and wow the world. When doing a plant project with children I always use scallions since they grow so fast with low maintenance, and children have short attention spans, that need to see live results.

How to Use Scallions

You can find them practically anywhere. Wild scallions might be growing in your backyard. Your produce aisle likely stocks them year-round.

Here are some shopping tips:

  • Pick scallions with crisp leaves and bright color.
  • Trim the top and bottom tips and rinse with water. You can eat both green and white parts.
  • Store scallions in the fridge for maximum freshness.

People often use green onions as a garnish on salads, soups, rice bowls or stews. But you can enjoy them in lots of other ways!

Grill them whole. Brush with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and grill them for a couple of minutes for a sweet, charred flavor.

Puree them. Put cooked scallions in a blender and mix in eggs, flour, and a dash of soy sauce. They taste similar to scallion pancakes served at Chinese or Korean restaurants.

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Boost Health with This Backyard Secret

Warning! You may want to talk to your doctor before using a natural remedy to treat a serious illness.

Since we can remember, man has looked to nature to cure poor health. Within the last decade notably, herbs have made their way into thought culture with the recognition of plant medicines resembling ayahuasca, ibogaine, and cannabis in the headlines for their powerful abilities to heal the most prominent diseases. However, these plant remedies can be forbidden to use for healing in many countries.

The good news is that common weeds in our yards yield superb healing skills and guess what — they’re legal! Here are twelve weeds that possess fascinating medicinal properties.

1. Red Clover (Trifolium pre tense) has chemicals that mimic the female hormone estrogen in the body. Medical professionals examine the herb as a treatment for menopausal symptoms like hot flashes. Doctors also warn women with a history of breast cancer to stay away from the synthetic estrogen. Estrogen-like chemicals have a way of bringing on cancer. 

  • The weed helps in reducing the complications during and after menopause.
  • It helps in improving bone density.
  • The plant extract is helpful to improve the immune system, treat could and respiratory disorders.
  • The decoction of this weed helps in regulating heart problems like high blood pressure.
  • The plant is also helpful in treating skin inflammation, eczema, and psoriasis.

2. Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) The plant is known to treat gout, aching muscles and joints, arthritis, anemia and eczema. It is widely used to treat joint pain. Capsules of dried stinging nettle is also a good remedy to reduce the symptoms of hay fever. It is also popularly used to treat bladder problems. If you boil nettle it can be eaten as a collared greens alternative. It is very easy to get stung by a stinging nettle. Applying crushed up dandelion, horsetail, Aloe vera, jewelweed or the leaf of a dock or lock plant can counter the acid in the sting.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/n/nettle03.html

3. Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum) is your livers best friend. This has been known for over 2000 years. Research found this may be good for people who damage their liver with alcohol. Silymarin is a chemical that may protect the liver from damage caused by a drug overdose, as well as damage from over the counter drugs like Tylenol. If you are a shroomer, this may be an antidote for a poisonous shroom.

  • The plant decoction is used to cure Jaundice and liver disorders, as it maintains the bile production.
  • The plant also cures heartburns and depression.
  • It is also used for allergies, blood disorders and has anti-aging properties.
  • The plant has been proved to cure Cancer, Malaria as it contains flavonoids which are helpful against the unwanted cells.

4. Horsetail (Equisetum Ravens) – The Greeks and Roman Empires used the herb to stop bleeding and weight gain, heal ulcers and wounds and treat tuberculosis and kidney problems. Used in a tea it tastes mildly bitter, like chamomile. It acts as a diuretic and increases urination. This stuff is so powerful, doctors suggest taking a multivitamin when drinking lots of horsetail tea because it can flush vital nutrients, such as vitamin B1, potassium and thiamine, out of one’s system.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/h/hortai39.html

5. Dandelion – within the past, Europeans used remedies made of blowball (Taraxacum sp.) roots, leaves and flowers to treat fever, boils, eye issues, polygenic diseases and symptoms. Practitioners of ancient Chinese medication take dandelions for abdomen ailments, and breast issues like inflammation or lack of milk flow. Dandelions have a bitter taste and contain vitamins A, B, C and D, and iron, K, and metallic element. Like Milkweed, Dandelion was a traditional remedy for warts. One would protect the skin surrounding the wart with Vaseline. Cover the wart with stem juices that were squeezed out. Let dry and cover with a plaster and repeat daily. After three days the wart should be dried up and a brownish color, it’s then it will fall off.  This weed can be used like coffee, it’s washed, cut into large pieces and dried gently beside the open fire or in the sun until they became hard and brittle. You want to drink it because, the root contains bitters, which is good for cleansing the liver, spleen, and gallbladder. In Co Meath (Ireland) pieces of the dried root were simmered in buttermilk, strained and taken as a cure for yellow jaundice.

Serious about using this?

Read More: http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/d/dandel08.html

6. Milkweed – The main use of this herb is for its benefit on the lungs. It helps with breathing conditions, liquefying mucous and reducing spasms. It has also been widely used by Native Americans as a contraceptive.  The sap produced, that’s milky white/The milky white sap produced, is used to remove warts, heal ringworms and snakebites. The sap contains latex, alkaloids, and cardiac glycosides. However, the herb also contains chemicals harmful to livestock and humans. The herb produces toxic chemicals to protect against hungry herbivores. It can help a person manage constipation and diarrhea.

7. Chicory (Cichorium Intybus), a sky blue flower is often seen along roads, provides the largest insulin supply. According to WebMD, patients use insulin to fight high cholesterol and triglycerides. Many women with type-2 diabetes benefit from taking insulin by reducing the rate of blood sugar increase they get after eating. hickory coffees happens when coffee lovers add roasted and dried root to their cups of hot water. Chicory coffee is big in New Orleans.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chicor61.html

8. Burdock (Arctium sp.) – Traditionally, healers use burdock to clear toxins from the blood and increase urination, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. The plant also is used to treat skin ailments, such as eczema, acne, and psoriasis. The leaves and roots of burdock are edible and contain inulin, like chicory, so they may aid digestion and/or cause a nasty case of flatulence. Burdock also contains high quantities of antioxidants that can prevent damage to cells.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/burdoc87.html

 

9. Plantain (Plantago Major) –  This is the weed commonly found in sidewalk cracks is actually one of the best healing herbs on the planet. Since the age of the ancient, Greek doctors have used plantains to speed wound healing. Native Americans have used it to heal wounds, cure fever, and to draw out toxins from stings and bites, including snake bites.

Plantain as a poultice is recommended on wounds or as a nutrient-rich tea to treat diarrhea. Plantain leaves are mainly used for herbal preparations, so it is best to pick just the leaves, rather than dig out the entire plant. Pinch off unblemished leaves, selecting slightly mature ones over the very tender leaves, unless you’re planning to use them in salads. Mature leaves have a higher concentration of potent phytochemicals.

10. Purslane – Is commonly found in yards and gardens, but most people do not ever consider harvesting it. It has a slightly citrusy taste and a crisp texture. It is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. This herb is also rich in vitamins A, C, and various B vitamins, as well as a number of minerals. Tilling brings seeds to the surface where they quickly germinate. Purslane seeds germinate best with soil temperatures of 90 degrees so mulching may again help to control it. Since it germinates in high soil temperatures also means it doesn’t appear until June.

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/prugol77.html

 

11. Lamb’s Quarters – Are Very Nutritious The leaves of Lamb’s Quarters can be harvested and used like spinach. Use this herb in your juice, salad, soup, or any recipe that calls for spinach. It has a high content of vitamins A and K, as well as calcium and magnesium. Lamb’s Quarters is considered one of the most nutritious wild foods. These are just a few examples of herbs and weeds that have nutritional value. You may have some of these growing in your backyard and not even know it. Before harvesting any outdoor weeds or herbs, verify the identity of the plant. 

12. Bee Balm (wild bergamot) – Bee-balm is most often viewed as a wildflower and actually sold as an ornamental.  However, this plant can occur as a weed in some pasture and rangeland environments.  Bee-balm or wild bergamot is found throughout the United States except in Florida and along the West coast. The flowers make an attractive edible garnish in salads. Bee Balm herb is a source of oil of thyme, and is noted for its fragrance. The fresh or dried leaves are brewed into a medicinal tea. Bee Balm leaves and flowers and stems are used in alternative medicine as an antiseptic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic and stimulant. A medicinal infusion is used internally in the treatment of colds, catarrh, headaches, and gastric disorders, to reduce low fevers and soothe a sore throat, to relieve flatulence, nausea, for menstrual pain, and insomnia. Steam inhalation of the plant can be used for sore throats, and bronchial catarrh (inflammation of the mucous membrane, causing an increased flow of mucus). Externally, Bee Balm is a medicinal application for skin eruptions and infections. Bergamot’s distinctive aroma, found in both the leaf and flower is wonderful for use in potpourri. While a fragrant herb in its own right, Wild Bergamot is not the source of the commonly used Bergamot Essential oil.

So there you have it, I covered some of the main backyard herbs, of course, there are many more. Maybe I’ll make a part 2 to this. Remember to be mindful that if you plan on ingesting these herbs, make sure they haven’t been sprayed with pesticides or treated with chemicals. Try looking in your own backyard to see if any of these wild medicinal weeds are at your disposal!

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/bethro34.html

References:

https://wellnessmama.com/59478/backyard-herbal-remedies/

https://juicing-for-health.com/weeds-that-are-medicinal-herbs

https://www.theorganicprepper.com/10-medicinal-weeds-that-may-grow-in-your-backyard/

http://www.naturallivingideas.com/plantain-benefits-uses/

https://altnature.com/gallery/beebalm.htm

http://www.pracreation.com/10-common-weeds-that-actually-have-medicinal-properties/

The Powers of Licorice Root

Licorice Root Benefits

Licorice root contains many anti-depressant compounds and is an excellent alternative to St. John’s Wort. As a herbal medicine, it has an impressive list of well-documented uses and is probably one of the most over-looked of all herbal wonders.

Hundreds of potentially healing substances have been identified in licorice as well, including compounds called flavonoids and various plant estrogens (phytoestrogens). The herb’s key therapeutic compound, glycyrrhizin (which is 50 times sweeter than sugar) exerts numerous beneficial effects on the body, making licorice a valuable herb for treating a host of ailments. It seems to prevent the breakdown of adrenal hormones such as cortisol (the body’s primary stress-fighting adrenal hormone), making these hormones more available to the body.

It has a well-documented reputation for healing ulcers. It can lower stomach acid levels, relieve heartburn and indigestion and acts as a mild laxative.

It can also be used for irritation, inflammation, and spasm in the digestive tract. Through its beneficial action on the liver, it increases bile flow and lowers cholesterol levels.

Boosts immune system

Licorice also appears to enhance immunity by boosting levels of interferon, a key immune system chemical that fights off attacking viruses. It also contains powerful antioxidants as well as certain phytoestrogens that can perform some of the functions of the body’s natural estrogens; very helpful during the menopause. Glycyrrhizinic acid also seems to stop the growth of many bacteria and of viruses such as influenza A.

Relieves pain and stress

It has an aspirin-like action and is helpful in relieving fevers and soothing pain such as headaches. Its anti-allergenic effect is very useful for hay fever, allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and bronchial asthma. Possibly by its action on the adrenal glands, licorice has the ability to improve resistance to stress. It should be thought of during times of both physical and emotional stress, after surgery or during convalescence, or when feeling tired and run down.

Control respiratory problems and sore throat

Licorice eases congestion and coughing by helping to loosen and thin mucus in airways; this makes a cough more “productive,” bringing up phlegm and other mucous bits. Licorice also helps to relax bronchial spasms. The herb also soothes soreness in the throat and fights viruses that cause respiratory illnesses and an overproduction of mucus, such as irritating coughs, asthma and chest infections.

Lessen symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia

By enhancing cortisol activity, glycyrrhizin helps to increase energy, ease stress and reduce the symptoms of ailments sensitive to cortisol levels, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromylagia.

Combat hepatitis

Licorice both protects the liver and promotes healing in this vital organ. The herb’s anti-inflammatory properties help calm hepatitis-associated liver inflammation. Licorice also fights the virus commonly responsible for hepatitis and supplies valuable antioxidant compounds that help maintain the overall health of the liver.

Treat PMS and menstrual problems

The phytoestrogens in licorice have a mild estrogenic effect, making the herb potentially useful in easing certain symptoms of PMS (premenstrual syndrome), such as irritability, bloating and breast tenderness. Although the glycyrrhizin in licorice actually inhibits the effect of the body’s own estrogens, the mild estrogenic effect produced by licorice’s phytoestrogens manages to override this inhibiting action.

Prevent heart disease

Recent studies have found that by limiting the damage from LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, licorice may discourage artery-clogging plaque formation and contribute to the healthy functioning of the heart. Research indicates that modest doses of licorice (100 mg a day) have this effect.

Latin Names

Glycyrrhiza glabra, Liquiritia Officinalis

Common Names

Chinese Licorice, Gan Cao, Kan-ts’ao, Kuo-lao, Licorice, Licorice Root, Ling-t’ung, Liquorice, Mei-ts’ao, Mi-kan, Mi-ts’ao, Sweet Licorice, Sweet Wood, Yasti Madhu

Properties

Anti-allergic, anti-arthritic, anti-inflammatory, demulcent, emollient, estrogenic (mild), expectorant, laxative, pectoral (moderate), soothing

Indicated for

Addison’s disease, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, athlete’s foot, baldness, bronchitis, bursitis, canker sores, catarrh of the upper respiratory tract, chronic fatigue, colds, colitis and intestinal infections, conjunctivitis, constipation, coughs, dandruff, depression, duodenal-ulcers, emphysema, exhaustion, fibromyalgia, flu, fungal infections, gastritis, gingivitis and tooth decay, gout, hay fever, heartburn, hepatitis, inflamed gallbladder, liver disease, Lyme disease, menopause, prostate enlargement, psoriasis, shingles, sore throat, spleen disorders, tendinitis, throat problems, tuberculosis, ulcers, viral infections, yeast infections. Reducing stomach acid and relieving heartburn and indigestion. Increasing bile flow and lowering cholesterol. Improving resistance to physical and emotional stress.

Do not confuse with licorice confectionery which contains very little, if any, licorice and is in fact flavored by anise.

Can cause water retention and raised blood pressure. Prolonged use should be avoided if you suffer from high blood pressure.

Can cause mild adrenal stimulation.

Black Garlic Powers

Black garlic has long been prized by Asians for its health benefits, but it became widely available in Western markets only a few years ago. Developed in Korea, black garlic has gained popularity among Western foodies for several years now, but it has recently caught the eye of the health-minded due to studies revealing its impressive nutritional properties.

 

The black bulb is created by fermenting raw garlic through prolonged exposure to heat and humidity, giving it a sweet, mellow flavor and an inky hue. No additives, no preservatives… just pure garlic. Fermentation takes place in a humidity-controlled environment in temperatures of about 140 to 170 degrees F for 30 days. Once out of the heat, the bulbs are then left to oxidize in a clean room for 45 days.This lengthy process causes the garlic cloves to turn black and develop a soft, chewy texture with flavors reminiscent of “balsamic vinegar” and “soy sauce,” with a sweet “prune-like” taste. In addition to the sulfuric compounds that provide garlic with its heart-healthy and anticancer benefits, the fermented cloves are a source of important probiotics. “Fermented foods help stabilize our intestinal flora. When the intestine is in good shape, it strengthens our immune system,” says Bellatti. Black garlic has been increasingly sought-after in high-end cuisine, and it is often used to make sauces, dressings, and dips.

 

 

Although the process is consistently described as “fermentation,” it really isn’t that in the strictest sense, as the transformation does not involve microbial processes—specifically, enzymatic breakdown and the Maillard Reaction are responsible for the caramelization of the sugars, dark color and deep, complex flavor profile. As the pearly white cloves slowly transition into their final black appearance, compounds in the fresh garlic transform into a whole new range of compounds. Compared to fresh garlic, black garlic is low in alliin but it is astonishingly high in other antioxidants.

 

 

Black garlic was found to have twice the antioxidant levels as fresh—the aging/fermenting process appears to double the antioxidants. Aficionados claim the flavor will impress even the most avid garlic-hater, as the pungency and spiciness is gone

 

Perhaps this is why Mandarin oil painter Choo Keng Kwang experienced a complete reversal of his psoriasis after just four days of eating half a bulb of black garlic a day—this, after trying countless medically prescribed skin creams that were all complete failures.

 

The Powers of Ginger

Fragrant, impactful and fiery, ginger includes a unique flavor and pizzazz to Asian-style stir fries and many vegetable and fruit dishes. Crisp ginger root is accessible year round in the produce area of your nearby market. Personally, it’s a favorite, and most used ingredient in my dishes. I also use it in teas, and with my morning juicing. 

 

Natural Remedy 

 

Ginger is a spice that has traditionally been treated as medicine in both Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, doses of 1-3g can reduce nausea and ease digestion quite effectively; super loading the powdered rhizome (vertical root) at 10-15g daily might increase Testosterone.

 

Health Benefits

 

Ginger is traditionally known as the stomach ache remedy. It has long been known to help alleviate gastrointestinal distress by helping relax and sooth the GI tract. In addition, it helps reduce nausea and vomiting. The anti-inflammatory compounds, gingerols, are the reason those suffering from arthritic conditions have felt some type of pain relief. To top it off, studies are now showing ginger to have anti-cancer properties and other immune-boosting and detoxification benefits. Ginger does contain numerous other anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds beneficial to health such as gingerols, beta-carotene, capsaicin, caffeic acid, curcumin and salicylate. Mature ginger will have a tougher skin that will require peeling before blasting, but younger ginger (usually only found at Asian markets) can be left intact.

 

When possible, choose fresh ginger over dried to get higher levels of gingerol and its anti-inflammatory compounds. Make sure the ginger root is firm, smooth, and absent of mold. Ginger is also available in dried form as well as crystallized, candied and pickled. You may keep fresh ginger, unpeeled in the refrigerator for up to three weeks or in the freezer for up to six months.

 

How to incorporate more ginger into your diet

 

Ginger pairs well with many different types of seafood, oranges, melon, pork, pumpkin and apples. When buying fresh ginger, look for a root with smooth, taut skin (no wrinkles) and a spicy aroma. Store fresh ginger in a tightly wrapped plastic bag in the refrigerator or freezer. Fresh ginger should be peeled and grated before use. In most recipes, one-eighth teaspoon of ground ginger can be substituted for one tablespoon of fresh grated ginger. Ground ginger can be found in the herbs and spices section of most grocery stores.

 

Ginger Peach Smoothie See Recipe Here

 

Add fresh ginger into your next smoothie or juiceQuick tips:

  • Add fresh or dried ginger to your next stir-fry or homemade salad dressing
  • Steep peeled fresh ginger in boiling water to make your own ginger tea
  • Use fresh or dried ginger to spice up any fish recipe
Ginger provides a variety of vitamins and minerals:
  • Carbohydrate – 17.77 g
  • Dietary Fiber – 2 g
  • Protein – 1.82 g
  • Dietary Fiber – 2 g
  • Sugars – 1.7 g
  • Sodium – 13 mg
  • Vitamin B6 – 0.16 mg
  • Calcium – 16 mg
  • Iron – 0.6 mg
  • Vitamin C – 5 mg
  • Potassium – 415 mg
  • Magnesium – 43 mg
  • Phosphorus – 34 mg
  • Zinc – 0.34 mg
  • Folate – 11 mcg
  • Riboflavin – 0.034 mg
  • Niacin – 0.75 mg
  • Iron – 0.6 mg
Figures above are per 100g of ginger.

 

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