Category: Sustainable Companies

Monadnock Paper Mills, Inc. – Bennington, NH Company Highlight

Another Brand to make an appearance at Sustainable Brands was this cool paper company from New Hampshire. Monadnock is a family owned an operated business with nearly 200 years in papermaking. They provide a diverse range of paper products including technical/specialty papers, premium printing, and packaging papers and melt blown non-woven media for leading brands worldwide.

With a passion for the environment and ingenuity, Monadnock is turning ideas into reality.

Across all levels of our organization, we believe there’s a lot to be said for doing the right thing — simply because it’s the right thing to do.

Socially and environmentally responsible investments in technology, processes, and products will deliver value to our customers and our community.

Monadnock Sustainability Commitment – http://mpm.com/about/sustainability/

Stewardship

We’re proud to be Forest Stewardship Council certified by the Rainforest Alliance.

All of our products are manufactured carbon neutral (VERs) using Green-e certified 100% renewable electricity (RECs). Monadnock is an EPA Green Power Partner, EPA Wastewise Partner, and EPA SmartWay Transport Partner.

You can tell a lot about a company by the company it keeps.  We have been recognized by leading environmental organizations including the Sierra Club, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and have earned the Governors Award for Pollution Prevention as well as the Cornerstone Award from New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility for our environmental efforts.

But awards and recognition aren’t why we do it. We do it because we live here. We do it because we raise our families here. And we do it because we would like to leave our beautiful area of New Hampshire as pristine as we found it nearly two centuries ago.

 

Monadnock Paper Mills, Inc. is committed to responsible stewardship of the environment by:

  • Promoting environmental awareness among our customers, suppliers, converters, employees and local residents.
  • Providing environmentally sustainable products and services to our customers.
  • Maintaining our record of compliance with environmental regulations and standards.
  • Continuing to invest in research to determine innovative ways to reduce waste and to efficiently use natural resources.
  • Choosing materials with minimal environmental impacts during the design and development of new products.
  • Encouraging legislators and state officials to develop sound environmental policies and regulations.
  • Senior management is committed to continual improvement in pollution prevention and in reducing environmental impacts identified in our 14001 Environmental Management System

Ramblers Way – Kennebunk, Maine Company Highlight

Women’s Wool Eva Dress – Style #161- $105

Clothing for a Good Life – Est 2009

I met a representative at the Sustainable Brands conference. I was hoping to chat with him and get some insight on their brand so I could have more to write about. Unfortunately, they shoved this card in my hand gave me a few lines I could probably read on the site and sent me on my way. I asked to feel the material and it was worth the booth visit. Though I wish I had more personal insight the opportunity to feel this textile magic was enough for me to write this blurb.

That had to be the softest wool I’m ever felt in a t-shirt. 

You can use this code (SB10%) now through June 30, 2017, for %10 off 

I did get the chance to visit: https://www.ramblersway.com/

The Ramblers Way Story

For Ramblers Way, sustainability is the pathway to making premium quality clothing. Our definition of sustainability is stewarding natural and human resources. It also includes creating local jobs by breathing new life into the country’s textile industry. Fashion trends come and go – we alter our styles too – but what won’t change is our commitment to the responsible and sustainable use of the resources. Simply put, we weave sustainability into the fabric of our company.

Their Products

Rambouillet Merino wool and Pima cotton are both known for their long staple fiber, which is ideal for specific knitting and weaving applications.

The coat of a Rambouillet sheep, an American cousin to the Merino breed, grows long naturally, providing what is referred to as long-staple fibers for weaving or knitting into cloth.

Rambouillet fiber is 4” long and uniquely thin (18.5 microns) in diameter, which means we can spin it into a superfine yarn. And, since it’s also a long staple fiber, it’s surprisingly strong when spun together. So you’ve got amazing strength and luxurious softness all in one silky-feeling fabric.

Benefits of Rambouillet Merino Wool

Moisture-wicking.
Natural fibers transport sweat away from your skin to keep you dry.

Body-heat regulating.
Wool buffers the elements to keep you comfy in warm and cold weather.

Remarkable quality.
Our wool yarn is worsted, compacted and spun to remarkably fine diameter so it’s super fine, super strong and doesn’t itch.

Long-lasting.
Looks timeless. Buy fewer pieces. Wear them more often.

Odor-repellent.
Odor-Free.

Biodegradable.
It comes from nature and doesn’t use harsh chemical softeners or finishes to provide comfort.

Long-Lasting Worsted Wool

Worsted yarn is made of long-staple fibers that have been combed twice to remove any short fibers and spun parallel to each other (vs. a woolen yarn, which is randomly entangled). This careful spinning process produces a clean, smooth and tightly knit yarn that’s free of the usual fiber ends that cause you to itch.

Our fabric is further defined by proprietary spinning techniques that remove any excess fiber to reduce potential pilling. This produces super fine, super-strong clothing that you can wear time after time.

Pima Cotton

Long staple Pima cotton was developed and propagated by the Pima Indians of the American Southwest. Ramblers Way Pima Cotton is grown in the San Joaquin Valley in California using low water and pesticide-free growing methods. Pima Cotton is commonly called ‘the cashmere of cotton’ for its softness and durability.

Sustainable Brands Day Three #SBDetroit17

Started off with an old banana, granola bars, old wine and potent hash.

Here are the sessions I sat in on: 

Trends in Values-led Hiring: How to Go About Hiring and Engaging People with an Encumbered Past

Jo Confino   Jo Confino The Huffington Post

Amy Peterson   Amy Peterson Rebel Nell

Emily Hunt Turner   Emily Hunt TurnerAll Square

https://www.emilyhuntturner.com/law-prisoner-reentry

Aurelio Dorris   Aurelio Dorris Urban Ashes

Mike Brady   Mike Brady Greyston

Paul Hickman   Paul HickmanUrban Ashes

https://urbanashes.com/

This was a pretty important, factual, right in your face discussion. Addressing topics most people prefer to breeze over. They discussed challenges and issues that many low-income and no-income households. These are serious issues human face all over the world. 

I had a quick lunch and met the CEO of Common Impact 

Danielle Holly

http://commonimpact.org/

At Common Impact, they envision a society in which all individuals and businesses invest their unique talents towards a shared purpose: strengthening the local communities in which we live and work. 

After Lunch, I sat in on a session the Innovation Lab:  Good Supply Chains + Materials 

Hosted by Georgia from Forum for the Future

They are an international non-profit working with business, government and civil society to solve complex sustainability challenges.

She recommended to check out https://www.thefuturescentre.org/ as a great source for information. 

We briefly discussed common supply change challenges like:

Biomimicry for new materials

After that session, I met Kevin Farmer from Michigan Science Center

He is their innovation and discovery consultant and also did demonstrations for The Strange Matter. Green earth Booth. 

They are focusing on exhibits that allow you yo experience the power of Materials on a Sustainable World. Their exhibits typically live at the Michigan Science Center

I ended my day at this session: 

Redesigning the Fashion Industry by Proving the Business Case for Sustainability

Cara Smyth   Cara SmythGCU Fair Fashion Center

Frank Zambrelli   Frank ZambrelliGCU  Fair Fashion Center (MOD)

Melanie Steiner   Melanie Steiner  PVH Corp.

http://www.gcunewyork.com/fairfashioncenter/ is a young department of GCU New York their mission is to prove the business case for sustainability in the apparel and accessories industry.